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News/Events

Exciting faculty research in the news, student research highlights and all current events related to the Center — you'll find it here.

GWAC research in the news.

Greg Walsh awarded a NASA WV Space Grant Consortium Fellowship

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Greg Walsh, a Graduate Research Assistant in Physics and Astronomy, and also the Center for Gravitational Waves and Cosmology, has been awarded a fellowship from the NASA WV Space Grant Consortium (WVSGC).  The NASA WVSGC is a group of West Virginia academic institutions with industrial partners under the sponsorship of NASA.  One of the primary components of its mission is to help build research infrastructure at its member institutions, along with awarding competitive seed grants to members. 

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Evan Lewis awarded a NASA Space Grant Consortium Fellowship

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Evan Lewis, a second-year graduate student in the WVU Department of Physics and Astronomy, was recently awarded a NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium (WVSGC) Award, which is a yearlong fellowship that supports students in a STEM field.  The competitive fellowship provides funding support for his tuition, conference/travel fees, and journal publication fees. 

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Mapping the Galaxy

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Astronomical surveys mapping regions of the Galaxy have been collected and studied for decades. These surveys, like the Waze of the Galaxy, allow researchers to compare previous data, further characterize objects or images of the sky, and learn more through statistical analysis.  For the National Science Foundation’s Green Bank Telescope (GBT) Diffuse Ionized Gas Survey (GDIGS), researchers took advantage of the power of the GBT, located in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, to better understand the impact of massive stars in the Milky Way.

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Stellar feedback and an airborne observatory; a team led by a WVU researcher determined a nebula to be much younger than previously believed

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In the southern sky, situated about 4,300 light years from Earth, lies RCW 120, an enormous glowing cloud of gas and dust. This cloud, known as an emission nebula, is formed of ionized gases and emits light at various wavelengths. An international team led by West Virginia University researchers studied RCW 120 to analyze the effects of stellar feedback, the process by which stars inject energy back into their environment. Their observations showed that stellar winds cause the region to expand rapidly, which enabled them to constrain the age of the region. These findings indicate that RCW 120 must be less than 150,000 years old, which is very young for such a nebula.

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