Events/Announcements

Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein's prediction

WASHINGTON D.C./MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos.

Gravitational waves carry information about their dramatic origins and about the nature of gravity that cannot otherwise be obtained. Physicists have concluded that the detected gravitational waves were produced during the final fraction of a second of the merger of two black holes to produce a single, more massive spinning black hole. This collision of two black holes had been predicted but never observed.

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WVU will use $9.65 million NSF grant to build science and engineering infrastructure that will benefit West Virginia

West Virginia University will use nearly half of a $20 million National Science Foundation grant to research areas important to the state and nation – a clean water supply and a deeper understanding of our universe – while also preparing the state’s workforce for high-tech jobs and promoting science education among the state’s students.

- See more at:
http://wvutoday.wvu.edu/n/2015/08/04/wvu-will-use-9-65-million-nsf-grant-to-build-science-and-engineering-infrastructure-that-will-benefit-west-virginia#sthash.lVBiJMxA.dpuf

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New National Science Foundation award to help continue WVU research Einstein's general relativity theory, 100 years on

A hundred years after renowned physicist Albert Einstein published his theory of general relativity, researchers at West Virginia University are using a unique pulsar system to test it.

- See more at:
http://eberly.wvu.edu/eberly_news/2015/11/18/new-national-science-foundation-award-to-help-continue-wvu-research-einstein-s-general-relativity-theory--100-years-on

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Student Pulsar Search Program Expands Nationwide Thanks to NSF Grant to WVU and NRAO

West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) together received a nearly $2 million, three-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to expand the reach and impact of the highly successful Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) student science education initiative. Approximately $700,000 of the grant will go to the NRAO; WVU will receive approximately $1.3 million.

- See more at:
http://www.aui.edu/news/student-pulsar-search-program-expands-nationwide-thanks-to-nsf-grant-to-wvu-and-nrao/

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WVU astronomer helps explain mysteries of 'Fast Radio Burst' discovered with the Green Bank Telescope

A team of astronomers, including a  West Virginia University professor, has uncovered the most detailed record ever of a Fast Radio Burst, or FRB, brief yet brilliant eruptions of cosmic radio waves that have baffled astronomers since they were first reported nearly a decade ago. The results of their research are published in the journal Nature.

See more at: http://wvutoday.wvu.edu/n/2015/12/02/wvu-astronomer-helps-explain-mysteries-of-fast-radio-burst-discovered-with-the-green-bank-telescope#sthash.Er1iw7WX.dpuf

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